US Supreme Court Rejects Hearing Case on Victims of Palestinian Terror

“Let him Champion the lowly among the people, deliver the needy folk, and crush those who wrong them.” Psalms 72:4 (The Israel Bible™)

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to hear an appeal regarding a lawsuit brought forth by American victims of Palestinian terrorism.

The case, Sokolow v. Palestine Liberation Organization, contended that the PLO and Palestinian Authority were responsible for more than seven terror incidents from 2001 to 2004 that led to American deaths, claiming that the attacks were carried out by security officers and other agents of the P.A. The American families invoked the 1992 Anti-Terrorism Act, which allows U.S. nationals to sue international terror groups for damages in U.S. federal district courts.

In 2015, a federal jury found the PLO and P.A. responsible for perpetrating and materially supporting acts of international terrorism against U.S. citizens, awarding the families $218.5 in damages, which tripled to $655.5 million as required by the Anti-Terrorism Act. However, the Second Circuit Court of Appeals in New York later threw the case out, ruling that the victims needed to show they were specifically targeted or that the attackers intended to harm U.S. interests. Additionally, it ruled that the Palestinian entities did not have sufficient connection to the United States that would subject them to federal law.



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