On Israel’s 70th, Charity Organization Finds Innovative Ways to Help the Poor

“How many are the things You have made, Hashem; You have made them all with wisdom; the earth is full of Your creations.” Psalms 104:24 (The Israel Bible™)

What do the Iron Dome, Waze, USB stick, hunger and poverty have in common? They all stem from Israel.

Today, Israel celebrates its 70th Independence Day (Yom HaAtzmaut). Known as the “Start-Up Nation” last year, Israel was ranked second by the World Economic Forum for innovation.

With its technological advancements, medical ingenuity and humanitarian aid, one would think that Israel could resolve one of its most pressing challenges: poverty. Yet, Israel continues to fall short in bridging the gap between the haves and the have-nots.

“The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development [OECD] continues to report that Israel has one of the highest poverty rates of any developed country,” Goldie Sternbuch, director of overseas relations for the Meir Panim charity organization, told Breaking Israel News. “Our restaurant-style soup kitchens, located throughout Israel, fill with people of all ages looking for a hot, nutritious meal, often their only meal of the day.”

As the Ministry of Economy and Industry, in conjunction with Ynet, recognizes Israel’s most prominent inventions and technological advances as part of the country’s celebration of 70 years of independence, Meir Panim is using its own ingenuity to help struggling individuals and families celebrate today and have a better and productive tomorrow.

Seeking to stem the vicious cycle of poverty, Meir Panim supports a network of innovative social welfare programs. In addition to their soup kitchens, they run after-school programs, which include fresh food for the children as well as tutoring, summer camp programs for at-risk youth and vocational training programs.

Meir Panim finds that many of our patrons come from broken, single-parent homes where, even working parents find it impossible to make ends meet,” said Sternbuch. “People take food from our restaurants in order for their children to have, not only fresh food, but also a feeling of a proper home, with food in the refrigerator.”

Of the nearly 9 million Israeli citizens, 1.7 million live in poverty. In addition to dealing with their daily struggle for food, impoverished people tend to lag behind in education because a hungry person cannot concentrate on studies and malnourishment affects brain function.

“If Israel is to remain at the top of of the list for innovation and ‘a light unto the nations,’ we need to take seriously the country’s poverty rates,” continued Sternbuch. “Whatever we do today helps build Israel’s future success tomorrow.”

A State of the Nation 2017” study, primarily from Taub Center research, notes that Israel has one of the highest costs of living in the OECD while large parts of the labor market earn very low wages. This discrepancy will potentially negatively influence Israel’s standing in ingenuity.

Israel has developed tremendous advances to provide safer food and cleaner water worldwide. The country has been on the cutting edge of cures for cancer and early disease diagnosis.

Israelis have traveled the world easing the suffering and saving the lives of those struck by earthquakes (Nepal, Haiti, Mexico), typhoons (Philippines) and other natural disasters.

Known for their “chutzpah,” Israelis resolve problems and pioneer new ways to solve old problems. Now it seems the time has come for the country to focus on innovative ways to sustain the lives of its own citizens. In the meantime, organizations like Meir Panim develop their own innovative ways to help those in the Holy Land survive and thrive.

To donate to Meir Panim’s network of social welfare programs, please click here.

Written in coordination with Meir Panim. 



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