Passover Snow Falls on Mt. Hermon for First Time in 21st Century

“For as the rain and the snow come down from heaven and do not return there but water the earth, making it bring forth and sprout, giving seed to the sower and bread to the eater, Isaiah 55:10 (The Israel Bible™)

Snow fell on Mount Hermon on Sunday during Passover for the first time in 22 years.

With approximately eight inches of snow already on the ground and accumulation set to continue throughout the day, the Hermon ski-resort management closed the site to visitors. Snowfall was also reported in towns in the Golan Heights.

Unseasonable rainstorms drenched the country from north to south, as vacationers tried to find ways to enjoy the Passover holiday indoors. Many parks that were opened for free to hikers and visitors for the holiday were closed, including the Ein Gedi nature reserve. Outdoor events around the country were cancelled or rescheduled for later in the week.

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While some local scattered showers were forecast for Monday morning, the day scheduled for the traditional Priestly Blessing ceremony at the Western Wall plaza, temperatures are expected to rise and rains to dry up throughout the week, according to the Israel Meteorological Service.

Massive rainfalls this year broke a five-year drought. Measurements at the Kinneret showed over triple last year’s rainfall.

The Kinneret, Israel’s primary natural water source, rose from just 16 inches away from the Black Line—the point past which the lake becomes ecologically imbalanced—to 11.25 feet from the Black Line as of April 20.

It is now 8.75 feet from its upper limit, after which point it would flood its banks.