A First: Chief Rabbinate Looking into Biblical Justification for Jews to Pray on Temple Mount

“And let them make Me a sanctuary that I may dwell among them” Exodus 25:8 (The Israel Bible™)

During their annual meeting the The Temple Headquarters organization noted that the police said that they are able to  enforce and protect Jewish prayer on the Temple Mount reports Rotter. More and more senior officials, including the prime minister, are willing to consider Jewish prayer on the holy site as well as extended Jewish visiting hours and also opening it on Shabbat.

This has compelled Israel’s Chief Rabbinate to begin expediting Halachik (Jewish law) studies on the matter of Jewish prayer on the Temple Mount.

The Chief rabbinate is the state’s religious authority. It has both legal and administrative authority over religious matters in Israel.

This phenomenon lies in stark contrast with the fact that when entering the Temple Mount, there is a prominent sign posted by the same Chief Rabbinate of Israel that warns: “According to Torah Law, entering the Temple Mount area is strictly forbidden due to the holiness of the site.”

But due to the massive amount of Jewish Pilgrims who have ignored their warnings, the Rabbinate appears to now be reconsidering their position. 

In an interview with Breaking Israel News, Joshua Wander, an independent public relations consultant in and around the Old City of Jerusalem explained that the sign is out of date. That’s because following 1967 when Israel reunited Jerusalem and received access to the Temple Mount, Jews began flocking there, unaware of the conditions upon which one is allowed to go up according to Jewish law.

Today, because of vast archaeological and historical research, there is more understanding about where one may go or must avoid according Jewish purity laws.

Breaking Israel News also reported that Prime Minister Netanyahu made assurances that Jewish prayer would be allowed on the Temple Mount before the Messiah arrives.