With Approval from Vatican: Canaanite Idol ‘Moloch’ Put on Display in Rome

Do not allow any of your offspring to be offered up to Molech, and do not profane the name of your God: I am Hashem. Leviticus 18:21 (The Israel Bible™)

The pagan Canaanite idol who required child sacrifice was displayed at the entrance of the Colosseum in Rome as part of a secular historical exhibition. The exhibition is part of a larger exhibit dedicated to Ancient Rome’s historic adversary, the city of Carthage. The exhibition is called ‘Carthago: The immortal myth’. It runs until March 29, 2020.

Moloch exhibit at Colosseum (courtesy: Twitter/Darius Arya

The statue’s presence comes just over a week following a video that emerged in what appears to be Pope Francis blessing a Pachama Goddess statue. It is well known that the Vatican is currently hoarding Israel’s stolen treasures from the second Temple.

A source close to the matter told Breaking Israel News that: “There is no way that such a thing could be done without direct permission from the highest levels of the Vatican. The Colloseum of Rome is owned by the Vatican, and specifically the Diocese of Rome, also called the Holy See. If anyone wants to do anything there, they must get permissions from the office of the Diocese of Rome. This exhibition, called “Cathargo: the immortal myth” could not be held there at all unless permissions were granted at high levels.”

The god ‘Moloch’, was historically worshipped by both the Canaanites and the Phoenicians.

Do not allow any of your offspring to be offered up to Molech, and do not profane the name of your God: I am Hashem. (Leviticus 18:21)

According to the Jewish commentator Rashi, the Canaanites would give their children to pagan leaders who made two massive bonfires. The child is carried by his legs between the two fires. The child isn’t really ‘burned’, but just passed through the two bonfires. The Torah prohibition is regarding the ritual of giving over one’s children to these pagan leaders to pass through the fire.

Parco archeologico del Colosseo (Parco), the organization that is managing the exhibition, claims that the purpose “is to help familiarize the public with the series of historical events that unite the two great powers of the ancient world, Carthage and Rome.”

“A reconstruction of the terrible deity Moloch, linked to Phoenician and Carthaginian religions and featured in the 1914 film Cabiria (directed by Giovanni Pastore and written by Gabriele D’Annunzio) will be stationed at the entrance to the Colosseum to welcome visitors to the exhibition,” a press release stated about the controversial exhibit.

The Colosseum was one of many Roman amphitheaters where Christians were tortured and executed to entertain pagan worshippers. The Vatican has remained silent and has not expressed any opposition to the diety’s presence. This has raised many eyebrows as the display comes on the heels of a controversial pagan ceremony involving the South American goddess of Pachama. The statues were two identical images of a naked pregnant Amazonian woman that were cast into Rome’s Tiber River.

“As bishop of this diocese (Rome), I ask forgiveness from those who have been offended by this gesture” Pope Francis wrote in a statement.