Israel’s Supreme Court denied the state’s request on Tuesday for an additional hearing on female genital mutilation (FGM) as grounds for granting refugee status reports Maariv.

The High Court made the decision earlier this year, contrary to the government’s position. The court ruled, with a majority of three judges, that FGM is consistent with a “well-founded fear of persecution,” The decision will in effect provide grounds for granting refugee status to minors and their parents as well.

Yair Netanyahu, son of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu blasted the decision warning: “It’s the end of the Jewish state! Many countries perform FGM on billions of people! As of now, they can all emigrate to Israel. The High Court essentially killed the Law of Return.”

Yair Netanyahu (courtesy: screenshot)

Netanyahu has hinted in the past that the pyramid on the roof of Israel’s Supreme Court is evidence of them being representatives of a globalist cabal. The structure was donated by the Rothschild Foundation.

In February, the Supreme Court accepted an application for refugee status from women from the Ivory Coast. Their parents claimed that they were at risk of FGM if they were to be deported back to their country. The family’s application for refugee status was submitted to the Interior Ministry in the past and was rejected. After being rejected, the family appealed to the Supreme Court, where it received a temporary one-year relief status to stay in Israel. Following Tuesday’s decision, they have been granted refugee status allowing them to remain in Israel while setting a precedent for future “asylum seekers.”
According to United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), In 2019, an estimated 4.1 million girls were subject to FGN while the number is projected to rise to 4.6 million girls in the year 2030.

According to Human Rights Watch, countries that practice FGM include Egypt, Yemen, and the Kurdish region of Iran and Iraq. FGM is also believed to be practiced to a lesser extent  in Oman, Jordan, and the PA – all now eligible for asylum status in Israel under the new precedent.