Jordan’s top court dissolved the country’s branch of the Muslim Brotherhood, a Jordanian official said on Thursday.

“The Court of Cassation [Jordan’s Supreme Court] yesterday [Wednesday] issued a final verdict ruling that the Muslim Brotherhood group is dissolved … for failing to rectify its legal status under Jordanian law,” the official said, according to AFP.

The Muslim Brotherhood is a radical transnational Sunni Islamist organization founded in Egypt in 1928 which seeks to Islamize society and eventually the world. Today, the primary state backers of the Muslim Brotherhood are Qatar and Turkey.

The movement’s spokesman in Jordan, Moaz al-Khawaldeh, told AFP that the group will defy the ruling and continue functioning.

“The Brotherhood will not melt away because of an administrative ruling, and we continue to carry out our activities in alternative rental properties,” said Khawaldeh.

He added that the Brotherhood intended to appeal against the ruling.

“The ruling is not final and our legal team is meeting in order to submit the legal documents necessary to appeal. We are not outlaws,” he said.

However, he added that “unfortunately, the authorities have shut the doors [to negotiations] … and are not offering any initiative to solve this crisis.”

Sheikh Hamza Mansur, head of the organization’s ruling council, said, “The Muslim Brotherhood … is a model of moderation and an important element in strengthening national unity, so dissolving it is not in the national interest,” according to the report.

Jordan has let the movement function for years and in 2015 supported a splinter movement called the Muslim Brotherhood Association.

During a White House visit by Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi in 2019, Mr. Sisi asked US President Donald Trump to designate the Muslim Brotherhood as a terrorist organization, a decision that was soon accepted by the State Department.

It should be noted that President Barack Obama, whose administration likewise met with  Essam El Haddad, a foreign policy adviser to the deposed Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood president Mohamed Morsi. The Obama administration adopted policies favoring the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt, with then-secretary of state Hillary Clinton openly calling for the release of Morsi after he was arrested by Sisi’s government after the coup.  The Obama administration used the language of “moderate Islamists” to describe the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt, and he called Iran’s President Rouhani, a “moderate” reformist, despite the rise of human rights violations in Iran on Rouhani’s watch.

In 2013, in his official capacity, the report reveals, Haddad met with Iranian General Qassem Soleimani in Cairo “to advise the Government on building its own security and intelligence apparatus, independent of the national intelligence services.