After a week of tragedies in Israel, a heartwarming story of brotherly love: Ynet reported Monday that over 1,000 people answered an urgent appeal to spread joy at an under-attended wedding.

Annette and Lior Solomon got married at an event garden not far from Ashdod Sunday night, but many of the guests assumed the wedding had been cancelled because the bride’s father had passed away only one month ago. Some relatives trickled in, but by 10 PM, only 10 guests had shown up.

Rivka, a relative of the groom, said, “What happened was that I arrived at the wedding and saw that it was almost ten at night and there were no people. I thought I had gone to the wrong place. There were only ten people. I saw my uncle and asked, ‘Where is everyone?’ He told me, ‘they didn’t come.'”

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Rivka decided to turn to social media to make her relative’s wedding day special. “I told myself that I would start posting. So it passed through word of mouth and more than two thousand people came. These are the Israeli people at their best. The groom and bride cried. Understand, at the wedding canopy they were alone. After the story was published, people came to make them happy.”

She spread the word about the wedding on Facebook. “The bride,” read the post, “lost both her parents in the last two years. Her father passed away a month ago, and now there is no one there except for a few relatives. You don’t need a gift, you don’t need money. Just come fill the auditorium, fulfill a mitzvah (religious obligation), and make a bride and groom happy.”

According to the paper, between 1,000 and 2,000 people responded to Rivka’s call. One guest, Dana Yaakovian, said, “I live in Yavne (some 8.5 miles from the wedding location), and someone from Yavne shared the post on Facebook and we decided to come. I arrived with my boyfriend, Liad Hajaj, to the event space. We saw the post at 10:30pm and arrived . . . half an hour [later]. There were already hundreds of people when we arrived, lots of music and people. People didn’t stop arriving until midnight and made the groom and bride happy.”