ISIS Recruiter Arrested in Germany

“For you have rejected your people, the house of Jacob, because they are full of things from the east and of fortune-tellers like the Philistines, and they strike hands with the children of foreigners.” (Isaiah 2:6)

The arrest of an Islamist State (ISIS) recruiter in Germany, hiding among the refugees, adds to the growing fears of radical Islamic infiltration of Europe as a dangerous byproduct of absorbing the growing wave of asylum seekers.

RTL television reported German police arrested Ayoub Moutchou on August 4 in a refugee center in Stuttgart, on suspicion of planning attacks for ISIS in Spain. He had used forged documents to enter the country. He was turned over to Spanish police on the basis of a European Arrest Warrant issued by a Spanish court.

A Spanish Interior Ministry statement said, “Moutchou had begun the necessary contacts, in the name of Islamic State, to carry out attacks in Spain in reprisal for the recent arrests of Jihadis.”

To date, more than 100 people have been arrested in Europe on suspicion of connections with ISIS, including 14 people arrested on August 22 in Spain and Morocco who stand accused of recruiting for ISIS. This arrest came days after a Moroccan was disarmed by off-duty American serviceman while perpetrating a terror attack on a French train inside Belgium.

In a related story, Spanish police recently arrested an 18 year old Moroccan woman in Gandia, a city near Valencia, as she was preparing to fly to Syria in order to join the extreme Islamic terror group, according to the report by AFP.

Raymond Ibrahim's Book

The fear of ISIS is two-pronged; that ISIS members will penetrate into Europe, hidden among the throngs of refugees, and that once inside they will recruit Europeans. The Europeans can return to their countries after training and radicalization. The European Union is being flooded with refugees, making identifying and monitoring suspicious individuals an impossible task.

To make matters worse, last week German customs officials seized boxes containing 10,000 Syrian passports. Many of the passports were taken from Syrian government offices destroyed in the war. It is feared that ISIS operatives could use the passports to blend into European countries, though they are also sought after by non-Syrians as a means of entering Europe. Syrians are given preference for being granted asylum since the country is presently engaged in a bloody civil war with many civilian deaths.

In March, French Prime Minister Manuel Valls predicted this dire situation in an interview with French television.

“There are 3,000 Europeans in Iraq and Syria today. When you do a projection for the months to come, there could be 5,000 before summer and 10,000 before the end of the year.”