83 Percent of Israelis See Trump As ‘Pro-Israel Leader’, But Only 3 Percent Think He’ll Move Embassy

“And Hashem shall inherit Yehudah as His portion in the holy land and shall choose Yerushalayim again.” Zechariah 2:16 (The Israel Bible™)

An overwhelming majority of Israelis – 83 percent – believe President-elect Donald Trump will be a pro-Israel leader, found a recent poll released by the Ruderman Family Foundation on Monday, despite the fact that most do not expect him to fulfill his campaign promise of moving the American embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem.

Only three percent of the 500 people surveyed said that they expected Trump to make the highly political move, which President Barack Obama recently vetoed for the last time during his presidency.

Long-standing American policy dictates that sitting presidents “delay” the Jerusalem Embassy Act, which would see the embassy moved to the capital, at six-month intervals. Obama approved his last veto on Thursday; the next time it comes due, Trump will be president. Whether Trump will break with tradition or not remains to be seen.

Of those polled, 43 percent believe there is also “no chance” that Trump will dismantle the Iran nuclear deal as he had previously vowed to do.

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The survey also asked Israelis how they felt about the increase in anti-Semitic incidents reported in the US since Trump’s election. Nearly half – 48 percent – said they were concerned.

“Our poll of Israelis regarding the new US administration and its impending impact on Israel and American Jewry shows that Israelis are optimistic that President-elect Trump will be a friend of Israel,” summed up, Jay Ruderman, President of the Ruderman Family Foundation.

“At the same time they are concerned about the growing incidents of antisemitism in the United States and its impact on the American Jewish community,” he continued.

Thus, while on a policy level “Israelis have faith in a strong relationship between the United States and Israel,” on a more personal level, they are also “worried about the new reality for their fellow Jews in America,” Ruderman concluded.