Holocaust

Called Mishkan Shmuel (“The House of Samuel”), the house of prayer was presented with a Torah scroll more than a century old that survived the Holocaust in Romania, unlike the Jews who read from it and were murdered by the Nazis. The scroll was repaired with new parchment and brought to the new synagogue under a blue marriage canopy, as celebrants sang and played music, according to tradition.

According to an interview earlier this year with Tablet magazine, Loinger and his group gathered the children, many of whose parents had been murdered or sent to concentration camps, under the guise of a summer camp and played sports with them, teaching them to run and retrieve a ball. “I threw a ball 100 meters towards the Swiss border and told the children to run and get the ball,” explained Loinger. “They ran after the ball and this is how they crossed the border.”

A report by CNN has revealed a “shadow over Europe” in the context of recent polls illustrating anti-Semitic stereotypes that are “alive and well” in Europe as the memory of the Holocaust starts to fade. Pollster ComRes partnering with CNN interviewed more than 7,000 people across Europe, including respondents in Austria, France, Germany, Great Britain, Hungary, Poland and Sweden.

Born Stanley Martin Lieber in Manhattan to Romanian Jewish immigrants in 1922, Lee sidestepped the horrors of the Holocaust. As a boy, he aspired to be a writer but at the age of 17, with the help of his uncle, he got a job as an assistant at the newly established Timely Comics. Writing text filler for Captain America comics, he began using his now iconic pen-name. He joined the Army Signal Corps in 1942 and wrote training manuals and slogans, made training films, and even penned cartoons.